Skip to main content

About your Search

20131202
20131210
SHOW
News 37
( more )
STATION
ALJAZAM 54
MSNBCW 43
CNNW 29
CSPAN 18
KCSM (PBS) 18
KQED (PBS) 14
KGO (ABC) 13
KPIX (CBS) 12
WRC (NBC) 10
CSPAN2 8
WJLA (ABC) 8
KNTV (NBC) 6
WUSA (CBS) 6
CNBC 5
( more )
LANGUAGE
English 324
French 3
Korean 1
Search Results 0 to 49 of about 331 (some duplicates have been removed)
elections. protestors say that's not enough. in ukraine, a symbolic gesture. as protestors topple a statute of a hero. >>> and early venezuelan elections, as that country struggles. tonight the crisis deepens in thailand. the prime minister suddenly dissolves parliament and is calling for new elections. picture of thousands rallying in the capitol where it is 11:00 in the morning. opposition party resigns from conflict. and the conflict is not over yet. wayne hay has the latest. >>> there is no indication that the prime minister will dissolve parliament, that they will change their goals. those goals have in fact changed a bit over the past few weeks. at first they said they would accept house dissolution. that quickly changed into their goal being the removal of the regime, referring to the former prime minister who was ousted in 2006 and lives in self proclaimed compile. his sister is now prime minister. they say the government is corrupt, this current government is corrupt and only trying to serve the interests of the the former l prime minister. house dissolution was not going to be eno
and the top stories, an early election but fails to put up tens of thousands of protesters trying to force her out of a job. >> live outside the office where the protest leader asked his followers to camp out overnight. >> reporter: french troops disarm fighters accused of hundreds of deaths in the african republic and we will be live if the capitol. breaking links with russia and think the time to stop blockading government buildings and worth more than its weight in gold, historic olympic metal shatters auction records. ♪ our top story on thailand prime minister called an early election to stop the political crisis that is gripping the country but has not stopped the tens of thousands of protesters who want to put her out of a job and say she is running a corrupt government on behalf of her bother and they are gathered outside of her office in the capitol of bangkok and they have flooding the streets of bangkok and began marching on the complex on the northern outskirts of bangkok at the government house. now at least nine marches started from different locations on the city on descending
dissolves parliament and calls for new elections. protesters topple a statue of former leader lennon in ukraine. they are calling on the government to break ties with russia and norm new ones with the e.u. >> and a day of prayer for nelson mandela. president obama and two former presidents expected to attend the memorial service for the late former president. >> welcome to al jazeera america. i'm stephanie sy. as a power struggle grips thailand the prime minister calls for fresh elections. the thousands of protesters in the capital say it's not enough. wayne hay has the latest from bangkok. >> there's no indication from the anti-government protesters that the announcement from the prime minister yingluck shinawatra, that she will dissolve parliament. the goals have changed. they said they would accept the solution and the resignation of the prime minister. that changed into the goal being the removal of the thaksin shinawatra regime - referring to the former prime minister ousted in a coup in 2006 and lives in self-impressed exile. his cysister, yingluck shinawat is the prime ministe
.s. ambassador to china. twice elected as utah's governor, he brought about strong economic reforms, tripled the state's rainy day fund, and helped bring unemployment rates to historic lows. in his tenure, utah was named the best state in america and the best state in which to do business. he serves as co-chair of no labels with u.s. senator joe masden. it's working to bring about solutions to attract wide support in congress and begin rebuilding the america's people's trust in the federal government. also with us today, is senator evan bayh. senator evan bayh is a former two-term governor, served also as the secretary of state of indiana and served in the u.s. senate from 1999 to 2011. as governor of indiana, he enacted welfare reform, cut taxes, and brought about fiscal disciplines to state's budgets. in the u.s. senate, he was a leading voice, advocating for fiscal restraint, on government spending. he also worked in a bipartisan manner, something missing right now, to seek consensus on several key issues, including financial services reform and health care. our plenary session will begin
there and calls for early elections. the demonstrators say it is not enough. and as south africa prepares for a huge memorial for nelson mandela, we speak exclusively to his eldest daughter about his final days. >> in the last moment, we were sitting with him on thursday, the whole day. >> welcome to our viewers on public television in america, and also around the globe. after weeks of unrest, today the authorities in ukraine are setting up their crackdown on protestors, just a day after a statue of former soviet leader, lenin was toppled in kiev, security forces have broken into the offices of the leading opposition party than and police are dismantling camps. u.s. vice president joe biden said violence has no part in a democratic society. i spoke to steven rosenberg. >> are the ukrainian authorities using different tactics? >> certainly today we saw far more police in the center of kiev than we did yesterday, particularly in the government district a short distance from independence square here. what they were doing was trying to push gradually the protestors away from key government bu
in election year. host: the house is expected to adjourn for the year on friday and the senate shortly after. a lot of high-profile legislation still hanging in the balance. it is the list of what is likely to make it through the 113th congress. caller: i think the only thing that is likely to get through is the defense authorization act. we will see what gets included. one thing we will be watching is to see whether any legislation sanctioning iran is added to that bill. the administration is doing everything it can to prevent congress from doing that but a lot of members are still interested in adding sanctions to iran. another thing to watch for is the farm bill. if they cannot get a deal they are going to have to extend existing -- finally the senate are here for and asked her week. they will look at a lot of nominations, particularly after the filibuster changes republicans ran through a couple of weeks ago. among the big nominees are the new chairwoman of the federal reserve, jackie ellen. host: another -- a number of articles suggest this is the most unproductive congress ever. why is
. this is not so bad. >> we are also waiting for official results from india's state elections. the opposition has be seen at the big winner. beginnal state will counting today. paul's point to the national vote which must be held by may. let's have a look at the prospects of the trading week over there and what happened on friday as well. it was higher by about 0.3%. we could be building on that. a group of investors is said to be considering a bid for the qantas fleet. that would offer the struggling carrier a cash lifeline. let's find out more. is this proposal exactly? i am assuming it is going to be -- >> exactly. these are fairly common transactions in the airline industry. qantas already has a fair amount of its fleet sold, about 2.9 billion according to its latest reports. there is another 7.2 billion there. wooleyoup led by greg has been involved with qantas for a while. been in globally aviation asset management. he was involved with some of the group who was launching the 2007 takeover of qantas. .e has proposed to come forward that would offer qantas a good bit of cash upfront which is
's ruling congress party has suffered a bruising defeat in key state elections. it's lost three of four states after last week's vote. now it seems to be an even bigger battle for the congress party to cling to power in may national elections. >> reporter: opposition supporters celebrate on the streets of india. the results of state elections are in. the vote was seen as a test of the coalition government led by the congress party when prime minister singh. the congress party didn't do well. the bjp won many and retained seats. new delhi was the main prize. djp has the most seats over, but couldn't manage an overall majority. winning here sent a clear message to the whole country. the congress party has been in power in the state capital for 14 years. not anymore. the anti-corruption party won second place and will make it a hung administration. >> translator: people will win this time. i'm confident the country will improve. >> translator: congress has been in power for three consecutive terms. we can't ignore the anti-i am couple bent see factor is strong to topple the government. i i
dissolve parliament and promises elections but that is to say a massive demonstrations will continue. courier protest is to set up barricades to prevent access to government buildings in kiev. the intent to disrupt the running of the country as civil servants and politicians tried to begin their working week. on sunday some of the top of the statue then in a symbolic times to present the tna convictions his parents because it ties with moscow i could've done it in a civilized manner and put it nicely in a museum like a piece of history. what has happened is the fault of the communists they have not given us the tools to do said in a civilized way because the key to the cost. they were against it said today in our country the anyway today was lights out. we will make you look a ticket the present by the government's decision to shelve and eat eighteen in favor of talks is russian the protest is on sale so it is to confront each of them now for weeks. i know i have corresponded in kiev says but the man told us that the opening of the men in statutes a controversial news to many ukraini
of south africa, black and white, would go to the polls in if first democratic election in that country, and elect mandela their president with 62% of the vote. mandela set about what to do what seemed to be an impossible task, stitching together these two people, one oppressed, degraded for years, the other a minority, fearing they would be completely disempowered. in his inaugural speech, mandela stressed it would not be that way. >> and i enter a covenant to build a society in which all south africans, both black and white, will be able to walk tall without any fear in their hearts. a rainbow nation at peace with itself and the world. >> mandela would transfer power after a five-year term and live to become the founder of a new nation, the living embodiment of its highest aspirations. joining me now is rohid. i cannot imagine the mood in south africa at this moment. >> it's a strange mood and it's very early in the morning here. so it's difficult to gauge the mood across the country. but what i can say outside the home of nelson mandela in the suburbs of johannesburg is this huge cro
is willing to resolve parliment but she will only do it with the guarantee that is free election taking place. an elected peel o people peoplel run the country before there will be a democratically election taking place. >>> still to come on this al jazeera news hour. sudan's vice president has resigned has part of the cabinet reshuffle. we'll tell you what that might mean. >>> and we are in interyeah wherinter-- indiawhere early stn results spell bad news for the ruling congress party. >>> in sports they extend an unbeaten run in breme. there. we'len we'll havethe details in. >>> prprotestors have called foa million man march. the protest against the government is in it's third week. they want to step up the demonstrations in the coming hours. we are in kiev. it does look freezing but the determination looks rock solid. so far lots of people coming out on the square, david. you have to bear with me it's extremely noisy. i will struggle to hear what you have to say. resolution is rock solid. the protestors need to show that they have momentum and they have legs on this meash eve machine l kee
elected president of a free and democratic south africa, and that actually came to happen. how would you judge his handling the presidency as that first democratically elected president in south african history? >> i'm glad you said that because he was the first democratically elected president, not the first black president. he was that because everybody had the right to vote, including africa africans. i was born in 1952, so i have no memory of this speech in 1952, but i do remember as a student at stanford be being involved in the divestment movement, trying to make sure that southern africa would divest from the system and apartheid would be ended. that was continued when i went to law school in the '70s and continued into practice in the '80s when we had thousands of people protest during the reagan years. and it was people of every stripe, and his legacy is something that will have to last forever and i hope that we won't just simply honor him when his birthday comes up, but we should think about a global, a global remembrance of this day, of nelson mandela's birth, not his death b
in the first mixed race election in south africa's history, nelson mandela was elected president. >> today is a day like no other before it. >> reporter: we were the first to interview him on that first morning as president elect. mandela tempered south africa's joy when he said healing his country would take time. >> it cannot be done overnight. it is going to take a year, two years, even as much as five years. >> reporter: from enemy of the state to head of state, nelson mandela's walk to freedom became journey shared by his entire nation. >> i have never been so excited and hopeful in my life in south africa as i am now. >> reporter: years later, nelson mandela paid a return visit to his former prison cell. this time accompanied by president bill clinton who later presented him with the congressional gold medal. mandela stepped down as president in 1999, but he lived long enough to see the united states elect its own first black president. >> so help me god. >> reporter: and in 2011, he was paid a visit in south africa by first lady michelle obama who brought along first daughters sasha
temps a free man . then it was elected president of the anc in nineteen ninety one. he continued to negotiate the president of the butte occurred to seek an end to the country's racist goals. three men were wanted them to the price in nineteen ninety three. nope all. i didn't fight at all. when paul. it was. apartheid when he came to an end in nineteen ninety four when like some africans were down to play for the first time in the country's history the agency won the parliamentary elections and nelson mandela was elected president of south africa eyes before you. they would get involved. by the bottle all this time. you have shown such a crime patient to detonation. will be made this card. as a whole updated. from the rooftops free at last the june nineteen ninety nine off to just one presidential term councilman dan everett on from politics. he remained committed to promoting peace and justice. the counts against fifty thousand pre invasion of iraq. and what comes out of the team needs in two thousand and five he revealed to the that is eldest son had delayed if the disease. th
where he predicted in 1952 that he, nelson mandela, would be the first elected president of a free and democratic south africa and that actually came to happen. how would you judge his handling the presidency as that first democratically elected president in south african history? >> well, i'm glad you said that because he was the first democratically elected president of south africa, not the first black president. and he was that because for the first time everybody had a right to vote, including africans, and it made a big difference. i was born in 1952, so i have no memory of this speech in 1952 but i do remember as a student at stanford being involved in the divestment movement, trying to make sure that not just south africa but southern africa would divest from this system and apartheid would be ended. that was continued when i went to law school in the '70s and continued when i went to practice in the '80s when we had thousands of people involved in protests during the reagan era because of south africa and it was black, white, men, women, young, old of every political strip
karzai said he would not sign it until after elections next year. >> protesters in ukraine returned to the streets in force. the president met with russian president vladimir putin. the meeting sparked fears an economic deal may be reached and russia, furthering the distance with the european union. >> there are reports that the ukrainian leader viktor ych signed a deal with russia securing, according to reports, $17 billion worth of aid. you -- ukraine, of course, needs the money to pay its creditors. the country's reserves are running live. it's in dire economic circumstances. these reports about the deal with russia are unconfirmed. of course they spread more anger amongst the demonstrators here in independent square in central kiev because, of course, they want ukraine to go towards the european union and it was failure to sign a deal with the e.u. that prompted all the protests. and on sunday they are planning the big one. they want to repeat the kind of successful mobilisation that they had last weekend here, and they desperately need to keep this momentum going, because they
, would go to the polls in the first democratic election in that country and elect mandela their president, with 62% of the national vote. mandela set about to do what at the time seemed an impossible task, stitching together these two people. one oppressed, degraded for years, the other now a minority and fearing they would be completely disempowered and the new republic would be dominated by vengeance and incrimination. in his inaugural speech, mandela stressed it would not be that way. >> and that what i build in a society, in which all south african, both black and white, will be able to walk tall without any fear in their hearts, assured of their right to human dig any. a rainbow nation at peace with itself and the world. >> mandela would peacefully transfer power after a single five-year term and lived to become a wise older statesman, the founder of a new nation. joining me now from johannesburg, south africa, is roheed, correspondent for our sister nation. and i cannot imagine the mood in south africa at this moment. >> reporter: it's a strange mood, and it's very early in the morn
was lifted. that year he walked out a free man. mandela was elected president of the anc in 1991. he continued to negotiate with president f.w. de klerk to seek an end to the country's racist laws. both men were awarded the nobel peace prize in 1993. >> we can stop the forward movement of these forces in the country. inapartheid came to an end 1994 when black south africans were allowed to vote for the first time in the country's history. the anc won the harlem in three elections and nelson mandela was elected president of south africa. >> i stand before you filled with pride and joy. pride in the people of the country. determination -- enjoy that which you can loudly proclaim from the rooftops -- free at last. >> in june of 1999 after one presidential term, nelson mandela retired from politics but remained committed to promoting peace and justice. he spoke out against the 2003 invasion of iraq and work at -- for aids. on policy he revealed his son had died of the disease. the last three years were marked with hospitalizations as he struggled with respiratory problems. had a lung inf
calls from old souls will find out that he was the cit elections in the country this spirit that is still with us the family of nelson mandela break that silence is showing that the statements of the anti apartheid icon also weighed on posting. an historic deal the days of talks wrapped up in body resulting in a new pack for the world trade organization. one which occurred at a trillion dollars to pay for the call it's a little something to very much to twenty knots the state two day summit attended by leaders of some forty african countries has all wrapped up it's not that evening and parts will topping the agenda the outbreak of deadly sectarian violence in central african republic. flinders bones requests for help from the country. the french president swaddled says that by the end of today's cross will have sixteen hundred troops on the ground that its former colony where presidents always has that some likely that the current government will be ale to see out its mandate which ends in twenty fifty he suggested that the elections be held the sickness and out to the frenc
will go on to the general election the election commission said that you think will be held the full fat free second announcement comes off to the thai prime minister it is sold the mill house of parliament. given that tend to calm the country's deepening political crisis this states when there are many people opposed to the government from many groups. the best way is to give back the power to the thai people and holiday he lacks in to the thai people with the side. but that government could pay for needed to behave with namaste and they can feed into the pool and on the net to hold his own country. more than a hundred thousand people continued to come the government has seen the distribution and the cooling of the connection with little to none. it is to be this that there could be encouraging he said no but the people's health and a two week it was because good people to face the tough and the eunuch has dismissed the idea is unconstitutional and undemocratic a higher than fifteen k but this post i will stick it on the hopefuls have thought that i'd seen in a two in two thousand and s
that the prime minister has called for snap elections. french troops begin to disarm fighters in the central african republic, the country hit by an outburst of deadly sectarian violence. those are the headlines on "france 24." thanks for joining us. tense scenes on the streets of the ukraine capital. riot police have been stationed hall.e of the kiev protesters are angry over the government decision to ditch a indmark pact with europe favor of closer ties with russia. they echo -- they accuse you ninkovich -- yanukovich of bowing to russian pressure. >> the tension in kiev has risen dramatically. riot police are gathering on two sides. busessee right police about 100 meters away from the front of the town. they are also coming down the hill. they have to go through the main independence square where the demonstration is still underway. he addressed the small crowd. more people are amassing. only around 100 people are still inside, mostly men. those who said they were prepared to defend the place physically. the deadline expired after a court decision. this was expected that there might be s
since bill deblazio became mayor-elect. time and time again, there has been no aggressive push back on naming the suggestion of bill brat on. >> he didn't exactly have a smooth relationship. for african-americans who live in new york, there is the story of the rejection. is it because they are not seated on the same page? >> that's largely because bill brat on was fired by then mayor rudy giuliani and on the cover of "time" magazine in may of 1996. rudy giuliani figures all in that story. they didn't like that. >> don't get between rudy and a headline. both in los angeles and new york, what kind of a police chief he will be. will he rely on stop and frisk or walk them back. >> if someone is wearing a ski market and checking every door, i want that person stopped. if you don't want a racist or unjust loser stop and frisked. i think people are concerned considering he expanded the use of stop and frisk in l.a. and he was champion of it in new york. he is going to rely on that. the key thing in terms of his legacy, he has been a numbered guy. he used numbers to drive down crime. what i
later he was elected south africa's first president. let's examine the man behind the status. our first guest had a strong connection. his grandfather taught mandela and his grandmother visited the south african leader in prison. it's a pleasure to have you here. i know you are the headmaster of the groten school. i'm glad you took time on what must be a hard day, given the family connections you had and you know him yourself. >> thank you for having me, i'm honoured to be here and i thank groten school for allowing me to be here. the man would have loved that. >> tell me about your family and connections to nelson mandela. >> my grandfather taught nelson mandela in college in social anthropology. they belonged to the anc, the same organization. my grandmother was also a political leader within the anc. >> and your grandmother then also was close to him and visited him in prison, and nelson mandela wrote her. >> several times, and my grandmother would write back. she told me she wrote so many letters, some of which never reached him. a few made it all the way and she put them into a boo
peace prize in 1993. the following year in the first mixed race election in south africa's history, nelson mandela was elected president. >> today is the day like no other before it. >> reporter: we were the first to interview him on that first morning as president-elect. mandela tempered south africa's joy when he said healing his country would take time. >> it cannot be done overnight. it will take one year, two years, even as much as five years. >> reporter: from enemy of the state to head of state, nelson mandela's walk to freedom became a journey shared by his entire nation. >> i have never been so excited and hopeful in my life in south africa as i am now. >> reporter: years later nelson mandela paid a return visit to his former prison cell. this time accompanied by president bill clinton, who later presented him with a congressional gold medal. mandela stepped down as president in 1999, but he lived long enough to see america swear in its own first black president, and he was paid a visit many south africa by first lady michelle obama who brought along her daughters. nelson
to the killings. francis hollande says the idea is to head as fast as possible towards elections. >> the french president is speaking at a summit in parris. jacky rowland was there. >> at the end of a 2-day summit the french took the opportunity of having so many afghan leaders under one roof to stay on for a short while and talk about the central african republic. it was decided to increase troops to 2,600. and to get rebels into their barracks, into their bases. in the longer term there are interreligious tensions on the country in order to hold a donor's conference. part of the reinforcements are an enlargement of the french contingent. francis hollande now has 16 undertroops. france will always be engaged in mali. 3,000 troops there, and 1600 in the central african republic. it wants to turn over african policing to african police-keeping forces. d in the two countries forbe some time to come. >> china irritated some nations and the u.s. south korea responded by making their own zone. a large part of it overlambs the japan zone and south korea has an air defense zone. its boundary is being
with my wife in westminster hall when he addressed both houses of our parliament as the democratically-elected president of all south africans. and i know i speak on behalf of the people in my constituency, holborn and st. pancras because they have a very special relationship with the anti-apartheid movement. the movement was founded at a meeting of about 60 people in the holborn halls in the summer of 959. 1959. its first leaflets were distributed a fortnight later outside camden town tube station. and its headquarters were always located in our area. it always had our support. so local people were particularly delighted when mr. mandela came to camden town in july 2003 to unveil a blue plaque this memory of ruth first who was murdered by the south african secret police and joe slovo who was a member of president mandela's first cabinet, and i'm delighted to see here observing us today his daughter, gillian. over many years committed people be in britain campaigned against apartheid, against the trials of the leaders of the african national congress and against the imprisonment that followed.
elected president. >> he no longer belongs to us. he belongs to the ages. >> don't call me. i'll call you. >> his magnetic sense of humor, mandela was loved by everyone from world leaders to celebrities. >> when he visited the u.s., aretha franklin sang to him. tonight she's with us sharing her special memories only on "night line". >> this special edition of night line will be back in 60 sec >> this is a special edition of "nightline" nelson mandela, a man who changed the world. >> good evening and thanks for joining us. nelson mandela's face is one of the most recognizable in the world. and tonight in south africa this symbol of racial equality died at the age of 95. from boxer to advocate, prisoner to peace prize winner, seemed mandela was always fighting for a cause greater than himself. it's clear that his legacy as a champion of human rights, equality and freedom will be forever etched in our minds and memories. >> like so many around the globe, i cannot fully imagine my own life without the example that nelson mandela set. and so long as i live, i will do what i can to learn from h
parliament and calls for new elections. [chanting] a day of prayer in south africa for nelson mandela and leaders including president obama and three former u.s. presidents expected to attend tuesday's memorial service for the late south african president. >> and a crime was never committed and we stood by that. >> reporter: the san antonio four speaking out, released after 16 years behind bars for a crime they have always maintained they did not commit. ♪ the deep freeze is on, wintry weather and cold temperatures reach the east coast. the weather is disrupting travel nationwide and made some sunday nfl games almost impossible to see. good morning and welcome to al jazeera america, i'm stephanie sy and the storm caused car pile ups in several states and accidents on the pennsylvania turnpike sunday involved almost 60 video as and this shows the long line of cars that came to a halt in morgan town, pennsylvania and we are tracking the storm. what is the latest? >> all of that snow and wind, it is still with us and we are going to continue to see it taking its toll and creating very
. it was the first time in 1984 after the benedict of the elections that we had seen mass protests in the country and that triggered i think a response here. it was particularly felt on the campuses and it took time but i think gradually many americans started to change their attitude to everything apathetical. it's interesting in our own history, there are so few times when progressive people feel as though they were a part of something that actually led for the a change, a concrete change, not only the release of mandela but change in government and the end of apartheid. we played a role in that in a small and significant way in this country. >> we have the political system and the debate over the sangszs in 1986 that played out in this country. more broadly, what were especially in the early days of the boycott movement in this country, what is it you were up against? >> i think sean spoke to it already, economic interests at stake were powerful. we had major corporations invested in south africa, universities and other institutions in this country invested in those corporations. they were not
mourners are gathering. they are celebrating the life of south africa's first democratically elected president. you looking at the scene. a man who became a towering symbol for civil rights for strength, for unity. >> days to come, we will bring you extensive coverage, detailed coverage of his life, president obama spoke about mandela minutes after his death was announced, here is what he said. >> we will not likely see the likes of nelson mandela again. so it falls to us to be the example he set, to make decisions guarded not by haste, but by love. never discount the difference that one person can make. strive for a future that is worthy of his sacrifice. >> . >> right now let's pause and give thanks the r the fact that nelson mandela lived, a pan who took history, in his hands. bent the arc of the moral universes towards justice, may god bless his memory, and keep him at peace. >> the president of the united states, again, live pictures in outside nelson mandela's home tonight, and here in new york, a live picture of the apollo theater, the same the venue in harlem, tonight the mar
military was threaten to have a coupe, and there was a good chance in 1994, instead of having an elected black majority, we may have seen a white racism military regime. it came very very close. >> professor, hang on, i can see ali velshi nodding here. >> yeah. professor remember in the negotiations leading to the first election, the white supremacist drove a tank into the hall where the negotiations were going on. this was very close. this could have gone the other way very well, and you will remember, professor, that there were discussions that nelson mandela was offered his freedom earlier in exchange for a very clear renunciation of violence and refused to do so. he argued if he renounced violence from the chance to negotiate from a full system. the government -- if they did not want to do a transition to a majority government, but wanted to come up with checks and balances one that still whites and blacks, and determined people under that regime. besides the tanks or the vehicle that went to the theater, remember also attempted military overthrow, in early 1994, and particularly the
from there to his release, and not much time later to his election as president, it was part of an era of historic change around the world that i think will be remembered as such for a long time. the president has spoken a lot about this, not just last night, so i will point you to what he said in the past. it is a remarkable thing. in broadcast and in print, you guys have been doing a terrific job of celebrating his life and noting how unique he is. there is no debate around the world about the fundamental goodness of this man. it wasn't always that way but it is today. getting really close to roberto was talking about dates but december 23 when sign up forto insurance, that coverage starting on the first of the year. when a 1 which is a date lot of people are going to be the systemis actually working the way it should be working. all about these up?s that are coming >> we are extremely focused on it, especially the teams and the tech teams. as i noted earlier, we met the goal that we set in november. we are still engaged in a lot of work and we have a lot of work to do to make sure t
elections. this when the country's main opposition party resigned in office. >>> the demonstration in ukrai ukraine, over closer ties with russia. >>> people around south africa took part in a national day of prayer to remember nelson mandela. memorial service set to take place on tuesday. >>> the mid atlantic and the northeast are getting hit by a bout of winter weather. drivers are facing treacherous conditions as a result of snow ice and rain. those are the headlines. talk to al jazeera is up next. sanctions. tehran says its ultimate goal is a permanent solution that could program. >> nuclear weapons have no place whatsoever in our defense doctorine. >> what was concluded in geneva last night is not a historic agreement. it's a historic mistake. >> many aftcountries, particularly saudi arabia is worried they are trying to buy time. the top diplomat is on a charm offensive in the gulf region. can he build bridges with iran's arab nabors? will he attend the syria talks in generva to add more than two years of killing and destruction? what is behind iran's overtures to the west? you will fi
africa held its first democratic election. that day nelson mandela cast the first vote of his life and was elected the president of south africa. >> today we're entering a new era for our country and its peop people. today we celebrate not the victory of the party but a victory for all the people of south africa. >> while mandela's presidency was only five years long, in that short time he managed to set south africa on a path to reconciliation, something that was deemed impossible only years before. but his legacy is not limited to one country on one continent. in concert with leaders including gandhi and martin luther king, mandela created a new template for leadership and a new model for peace in the world. indeed in the struggle for human rights mandela has been and still is a guiding light for the oppressed, forgotten and the lost. when i travel to the zimbabwe border as part of a human rights canal pain for children, young people were streaming across the border by hundreds. they were alone with nothing but the clothes on their backs and they were bound for south africa drive
to help us hold elections so wreck choose a president deserving of the name and leave the country t they have to stay for thetrition. >> there are some people who have comparing this to rawanda in 1994. the genocide there killed hundreds of thousands of people. there are differences that was ethnic violence. here, it is sectarian. religious leaders are preaching peace, not hate. >> there is a growing atmosphere of ven he knew. you can't call it genocide yet. that would be imprudent but what is certain is that from now on central african republic, society will never be the same again >> reporter: there are many examples in history of where international forces have intervened too late. for the world, it's finally, taking notice that what is happening here al jazeera, bange. >> a deepening crisis in tie land as members of the main opposition party resign from parliament today. the party said it stepped down in protest calling the current government illegitimate, refusing to work with the prime minister. it increases the political crisis in that country. five have been killed since mas
. michelle has to stay and france has to help us hold elections so we can choose a president deserving of that name and leave the country. jadadea has to stay for thetrition >> reporter: there are some people comparing this to rwanda in 1994. the genocide there killed hundreds of thousands of people. there are differences. >> that's with ethnic violene violence. here it is sectarian. religious leaders are preaching peace, not hate. >> there is a growing atmosphere of ven he knew. you can't call it genocide yet. that would be an imprudent. but what's certain is that from now on, in central africa republic, soil will never be same again. >> there are many examples in history of where international forces have intervened too late. for the world, it's finally, taking notice that what is happening herays, bongee. >> praising for new mexico new mexico range from pulpits around the world on this national day of prayer in south africa. members of all faiths honor the former president, a steady flow of mourners stopped by his home in johan he isburg. nigeria called for three days of mourning a
the cat's got their tongue. or is it the calendar. with elections coming next year and those on the right with any iq have noticed the one time the democrats saw their numbers go skyward was when the republicans played stupid party and turned themselves into the anyone couple pops of the potomac and shut done the government. tonight we look at this strange new world, scared to death at the second there's talk of closing it the democrats will open up another big lead in public confidence. who would have believed it would only take a month to teach the tea party that no government is bad politics. david corn for mother jones and howard fineman for "the huffington post" both msnbc political analysts. i know there are still questions about febds. but this week when it looks like they might have a budget deal and january when the continuing resolution comes up for continuing, it looks like they've decided not to go all-out crazy again. is this pure politics or grownup behavior or a mix? >> well, don't count your non-shutdowns before they happen. because there are 20 or so house g g g gop'ers.
. >> it is really an ordeal to be in public life sometimes. >> is winning elections worth the ordeal? and how do you fend off the attacks? we'll ask our strategists coming up. and we've made a big commitment to america. bp supports nearly 250,000 jobs here. through all of our energy operations, we invest more in the u.s. than any other place in the world. in fact, we've invested over $55 billion here in the last five years - making bp america's largest energy investor. our commitment has never been stronger. hands for holding. feet, kicking. better things than the joint pain and swelling of moderate to severe rheumatoid arthritis. if you're trying to manage your ra, now may be the time to ask about xeljanz. xeljanz (tofacitinib) is a small pill for adults with moderate to severe ra for whom methotrexate did not work well. xeljanz can lower your ability to fight infections, including tuberculosis. serious, sometimes fatal infections and cancers have happened in patients taking xeljanz. don't start taking xeljanz if you have any kind of infection, unless ok with your doctor. tears in the stomach or in
and others would have been disaster for any government. we are heading to a general election. parliament will be dissolved and a general election amount. the upa government will go to the masses and say, "this is what we have done for you." they are hoping that the masses will react to that knowing that the subsidy issue will be left indefinitely until a permanent solution can be found, one that india agreed to. >> a philippine congressman joins me from oz low. this is the first deal the world trade organization has completed in 18 years. was it worth the wait? >> i think for developing countries it's not a bad deal. the problem is in terms of the deal - the big problem is agriculture has been a massive subsidy that the developed countries have been given the farming sector, over $300 million a year. it puts the burden on the developing country's government to reduce their minimal subsidies. in spite the fact of the schedule it puts the burden on us. as far as trade, i think everybody recognises that the main beneficiaries will be the developed countries and the big corporations - small
of preventing bloodshed. >> in a two-day seminar, francis hollande is calling for elections from the central african republic by removing the rebels who took control. >> at the end of the two day summit the french together the opportunity of having so many on and talk about the pressing subject, the central african republic. there were plans for the troops to disarm rebels, getting militia into their bases and get the armed men off the street. in the longer terms reducing tensions in the country. >> now, part of the enforcements are an enlargement of the french contingent. there are now 1600 french troops in the central african republic. france is engaged in mali. in the longer turn it wants to turn over african policing to african police keeping forces. france is engaged in two countries for time to come. >> a u.s. veteran is back home with his family after being held in north korea for more than a merrill newman arrives home today. his family called his time in north korea, "a difficult ordeal." melissa chan with that story. >> when merrill newman made the trip to remote north korea, he wo
should sue us for trademark infringement. despite the election results, there are two schools of thought in the gop. there seem to be two schools of thought on practically every issue today in the gop. but as it comes to elections and how to win elections, one group thinks that what republicans need to do is get more of the base out. another group that i belong to thinks that what we have to do is grow the base. we can't just rely on traditional republican voters. and what i believe is that old, straight, white male voters just ain't what they used to be. and don't get me wrong, i love old, straight, white males. i'm married to one. [laughter] i'm friends with some. [laughter] i've even voted for several. but they're just not winning elections these days. and that is a reality. the demographic trends are just not swinging in their favor. demography matters in politics. that's what jeb bush said yesterday if new york when i was with him. mitt romney got 27% of the latino vote. the percentage of latino voters is increasing, and the percentage of white voters is decreasing. and i know that
career. one was the fall of the berlin wall in 1989. the other was the first democratic election in south africa five years later. i was there when the country's black majority voted by the millions waiting in lines that stretched from one horizon to the other. i saw first hand the devotion to democracy and the non-violent political change that was the great legacy of the man who died today. president obama paid tribute to nelson mandela today. through his fierce dignity and unbending will to sacrifice his own freedom to others, he transformed south africa and moved all of us. his journey from prisoner to president embodied the promise that human beings and countries can change for the better. his commitment to transfer power and reconcile with those who jailed him set an example for all humanity to aspire to. whether in the lives of nations or in our own personal lives. >>> i promised you the president of the united states, and he's here. let's play "hardball." ♪ >>> it's my honor to introduce the president of the united states. >> hey. >> well, thank you, mr. president. thank you, dr.
and the other was the election in south africa five years later. i was there when the black majority voted by the millions, stretching from one horizon so the other. i saw firsthand the devotion to democracy and the great legacy of the man who died today. president obama paid tribute to nelson mandela today. through his fierce dignity, an unbending will to sacrifice his own freedom for the freedom of others he transformed south africa and moved all of us. embodied the that countries can change for the better. his commitment for the power and reconcile with those who jailed him set an example for all humanity to aspire to, whether in the lives of nations or in our own personal lives. >>> i promised you the president of the united states, and he's here. let's play "hardball." ♪ >> it's my honor to introduce the president of the united states. >> hey. [ applause ] ♪ >> well, thank you, mr. president, and thank you, dr. neil kirk win is here, the president of the american university for having us here today. >> it's good to see you. >> so what brought you to "hardball"? >> american univers
mandela had been elected president the night before, and i had the honor of being the first western journalist that day to shake his hand and sit down and talk with him. mandela showed no bitterness or anger. he was famous for that. no thought of revenge when i asked him about his predecessor f.w. de klerk, he spoke only of reconciliation and working together. >> our relations with mr. de klerk are fairly good. and he is one of those republicans i hold in high regard. we have had some differences. we have quarreled. we have said cruel things against each other. but at the end of the day, we are able to shake hands and think of the interest of south africa. and he has had that experience which i have not had. and if my organization comes out with majority in the elections, i will have to depend very much on his support, his experience. >> what happens when nelson mandela has to use force against elements of south africa's black community? are you willing and able to take on the political pressures that will take place? >> i don't expect a government -- as well as governments would re
activism began in college. he was elected to the student council, but stepped down and joined a boycott over conditions at the school. he moved to johannesburg, studied law and joined the african national congress, a political and religious movement fighting segregation. it grew sharper when south africa elected a white government passing laws taking racism to the extreme. the resettlement of 3 million, deprives the right to vote and travel. stripping them of citizenship. nelson mandela was 30. he was convinced peaceful demonstrations would never be enough. he helped to form and one an amped guerilla movement. a campaign of bombings and sabotage in the '60s led to his arrest and prosecution along with others in the movement. convicted but spared a death sentence, nelson mandela would spend a quarter of a century, 27 years behind prison walls, 18 of them at the notorious robin island. outside the fight grew more fears. aggression and violence focussed the attention of the world on racism. nelson mandela became the most famous prisoner in the world. the powerful international condemnation
. but non-white people need add internal passport. papers please. at the end of world war ii, the election in south africa in 1948 unexpectedly brought to power a nationalist government on a platform they called apartness. in their language, it was pronounced apartheid. they started codifying immediately all the various ways that they could separate the population by race and treat people according to the ways that they thought the various races should be treated. in 1949, the prohibition of mixed marriages act which banned people of different races from getting married to each other, whether or not you got married, the immorality act of 1950 made sexual relations between different races a criminal act. also in 1950 the population registration act which made everyone in the country register by race and receive a racial classification, black, white, indian or colored. those were the four categorieca. and there were a million sub categories beneath those. not beneath white of course, white was just white. but for everybody else it could be a little more complicated. also in 1950, the group a
a democratic elected governor. how would you assess this week's signups, increased substantially. there seems to be a lot of interesting with a lot of people going to the sites. how would you assess this now that we're at the end of the week? >> i mean, it's been a great week for the aca, there's no question about it. the kinks appear to be out. we're not quite sure about the back end, but i think it looks pretty good. the kinks seem to be out of the system. more and more people driven to it. more and more people are signing up. and the sad part for the republicans is it's only going to get worse for them. it's only going to get better. as the kinks are totally smoothed out of the system, people will find this bill, they'll find it's like heaven. and for other people they're going to find they've got better plans and they've got the freedom to choose and they can compare and they can shop which we never had the ability to do in america. i think it's going to be more successful each month it passes. so the republicans better find another horse to ride, because they can't ride this one. >> you
Search Results 0 to 49 of about 331 (some duplicates have been removed)